Showing posts with label Beer and Food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Beer and Food. Show all posts

June 19, 2012

Charleston, SC: Closed for Business

After depositing our spoils from CBX, Cristina and I strolled up King Street to see what other Charleston beers we could find at Closed for Business.  Featured as one of Draft Magazine's Best Beer Bars of 2012, this pub has 42 taps, including select craft beer from across the country and many of the local drafts.  All the beers are available in 10 oz., 16 oz., or 1-Liter servings, and you can also fill up a growler to take home.  Food-wise, Closed for Business prides itself on buying local, sourcing from producers such as Ashley Bakery, Bell Honey, Fresh Pickleworks, Mepkin Abbey, and a number of local farms.

We walked in and started with some Crispy Green Beans (with homemade ranch), a Holy City Weak Sauce Stout, and a Coast HopArt IPA.  The beers were both good, but those green beans were killer...

June 11, 2012

Alpharetta, GA: 5 Seasons Restaurant & Brewery

I've been hitting the road pretty hard lately; now it's time to get caught up. This is post #100! Here goes!

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For my first brewpub adventure of this state-side road trip, I decided to check out 5 Seasons Restaurant and Brewery. There are three locations in the greater Atlanta area: Westside, Sandy Springs, and Alpharetta. My girlfriend and I went to the Alpharetta location for their weekly Cask Ale tapping (every Thursday at 5:55pm), but also because of the 5 Seasons philosophy that focuses on buying local ingredients and using what's in season:

"At the 5 Seasons we source much of our produce and meats from local and sustainable farms when they are in their peak of flavor.  That is what we call the '5th Season.'  From these wonderful ingredients we prepare a plethora of specials every day."

May 19, 2012

Costa Rica: Volcano Brewing Company

[Update: On August 28, 2013, Volcano Brewing Company will close their Arenal location and relocate to Playa Tamarindo.]

One of the big players in Costa Rica's rapidly growing craft beer scene, Volcano Brewing Company offers artisanal beer and spectacular views in a relaxed atmosphere. As part of our trip to the Costa Rica Craft Beer Festival, my girlfriend and I decided to make a beer-cation of it and check it out...

May 10, 2012

4 Easy Ways to Use Spent Grain

For everyone who celebrated National Homebrew Day on Saturday, this one's for you:

One issue that most brewers have to deal with is spent grains. After mashing your grains with water to draw out the fermentable sugars, what do you do with all that leftover grist? While some breweries are happy to give the grains away to farmers for livestock feed, others are forced to just throw it away.

After my recent brew day, I tried four different ways to reuse that spent grain:

April 26, 2012

Costa Rica: La Primera Festival Cerveza Artesanal

While craft beer is taking the US by storm, the movement in other parts of the world is just starting to gain momentum. This past Saturday was the first ever Festival Cerveza Artesanal in Costa Rica, organized by the small but growing community of craft breweries, homebrewers, retailers, and enthusiasts in this Latin American country known for its ecotourism and laid back, Pura Vida attitude. (Pura Vida translates to "the good life" or "the pure life" and can be used to say hello, goodbye, or in response to the question "how's it going?")

The festival was held outdoors on the swanky shopping strip Avenida Escazú, in a suburb of San Jose, the capital of Costa Rica. The weather was perfect, with a good mix of both Ticos and foreigners arriving for the event right on time.

April 15, 2012

Esquire: Beer and Cheese Pairing Guide

Trying to figure out what to pair with your suds this spring?  Check out this Beer and Cheese Pairing Guide from Esquire Magazine for a few ideas.

We tried the hefeweizen/chevre combo for the Una Noche de Cerveza beer dinner and it was a huge hit.


Hungry yet?  Learn more about beer and cheese pairings on BeerAdvocate.com.

April 8, 2012

Panama Brews Part 3: Una Noche de Cerveza

Last week, I teamed up with a couple other expats (Katie Garstin & Blayne Ladner) to present Una Noche de Cerveza. The mission: to jump-start craft beer culture in Panama City with an exclusive beer pairing dinner. Blayne generously opened up the Super Gourmet for the evening while Katie and I put together a menu consisting of four courses and five, 6-ounce beers to accompany each course:

March 17, 2012

Imbibe Mag: 6 Ways to Make the Most of Your Irish Stout This St. Paddy's

Some amazing recipes for cooking with your Irish Stout in Imbibe Magazine the other day. I've made Chocolate Stout Cupcakes before using some of my very own homebrew (cerveza casera en espanol) -- they were "pure evil."

Now, for the true beer nerd with too much time on their hands (per NPR):



Everyone have a safe and enjoyable St. Patty's Day!

-D

March 6, 2012

Panama Brews Part 2: The Imports (or Are They?)

Panama City, located on the Southern access of the Panama Canal, is considered by many to be the economic hub of Latin America. Each year, roughly 14,000 ships pass through the Canal, which in 2011 generated some $1.7 billion in revenue for this developing country. These numbers will surely increase with the ongoing Canal Expansion Project. Not surprisingly, economic activity like this attracts international attention -- which translates directly to the selection on the beer aisle.

January 27, 2012

Cooking with Beer

One major benefit of being a homebrewer is that you often have a variety of really good beer on hand. This surplus of cerveza, while keeping you and everyone you know sufficiently buzzed, also lends itself to experimentation in the kitchen. Over the past couple months, I've used beer to make stir-fried brussels sprouts, spicy spent grain stew, and chocolate stout cupcakes.

Pale Ale & Garlic Brussels Sprouts

My girlfriend and I really love brussels sprouts. Sure, by themselves they're pretty bitter, but if you cook them right (for me that usually means lots of garlic), they're delicious. Plus, they're really good for you. Brussels have practically no fat (we'll fix that don't worry), are packed with vitamins C and K, have a nice dose of fiber and protein, and are low in the glycemic index. So, when I saw this recipe from Stone's new cookbook on BillyBrew.com, I knew I had to give it a shot - with a few personal tweaks, of course.

Steps 1 - 3: Steam 1 pound of brussels in salted water for about 4 minutes. Rinse with cold water to stop the cooking. Slice the brussels in half lengthwise.

Brussels post-steam and about 6 cloves chopped garlic.

Steps 4 - 5: Heat 1/4 cup olive oil (that's good fat!). Start with high heat but take it down to medium before it starts smoking. Add 1/4 pound diced pancetta (the tasty fat!) and cook til brown.

Not good fat - but yummy fat.
Steps 6 - 7: Add 6 cloves of minced garlic. Turn up the heat and add the brussels. Stir fry for 4 - 5 minutes.


Step 8: Add a bottle of pale ale. Nothing excessively hoppy, because the beer will cook down and that bitterness will be condensed. The recipe calls for Stone Pale Ale, but since I didn't have any of that, I used some of my homebrewed Amarillo Pale Ale in a Stone IPA bottle. Is that wrong? I don't think so. Cook til the beer is almost all gone.


Steps 9 - 11: Use a 1/4 cup of vegetable stock to deglaze the pan, let it cook off completely, and transfer the brussels to a bowl or serving dish. Add salt and pepper to taste. Toss with sun-dried tomatoes and parmigiano-reggiano cheese and serve!


Yup, I ate it all in one sitting.  The only thing I'd do differently next time is make sure that pancetta is nice and crispy.  Man, I'm getting hungry...

Spicy Grain Soup


Whether a homebrewer or a commercial brewer, one question that comes up a lot is what to do with your grains after they've been mashed. I suppose you could just throw them out with the garbage, but I usually compost my spent grains and trub. The grains, however, can also be used to make bread, cookies, or in this case, soup. I decided to hold on to some of my spent grains to use in this recipe from Food & Wine in place of the barley, bulgur, and rice.

Long story short, this soup came out great. Basically I skipped steps 1 and 2 from the original recipe because the grains we already cooked through the brewing process. You start by sauteing the onions, garlic, and chile peppers, roughly chopped because it all gets pureed in the blender later. Then comes the broth, cilantro, diced tomatoes, and seasonings. Just for fun, I substituted about half of the vegetable stock with some of my homebrewed chocolate stout.


After cooking this mixture for 45 minutes, it all gets pureed together. ***Let the soup cool a little before you blend it and be careful. You don't want hot soup to spill all over you, so fill the blender less than half way full to start with, blend in small batches, and hold the top on TIGHT. You'll end up with something like this:


Then come the mushrooms, black beans, carrot, zucchini and parsnips. Trader Joe's carries a bag of pre-diced parsnips and rutabagas that will work just fine.




For the last step, all I had to do was take a couple cups from my spent grains and throw them in the soup. There's still plenty of protein and fiber in those grains to make this a very healthy meal! Unlike what we have here for dessert...


Chocolate Stout Cupcakes


I don't have any photos from this experiment, but let me tell you -- these were pure evil, in the best sense of the word. My girlfriend and I made these right before Christmas using this recipe from the Food Network. Again, I used my chocolate stout in this recipe, but I'm sure Guinness will work just fine. The only tweaks we made were to use margarine instead of butter and to cut the powdered sugar in the cream cheese icing down to 3/4 cup. That was plenty sweet for us.


These turned out to be some of the best cupcakes I've ever had. They were super moist for days and the icing had flavor, not just sugar. From scratch is really the way to go.


So get in the kitchen already -- what can you make with homebrew or beer from your local brewery?

December 14, 2011

Chicago, IL - Beer School Day 2

On Day 2 of the Siebel course, we hit the ground running and dove straight into some spreadsheets. Tim Lane of Goose Island Brewpubs led the session and guided the class through various charts, sales projections and cost analyses, demonstrating how important the math can be when running a restaurant.

Just a few of the things you need to ask yourself if you want your pub to be successful: What's the average check amount? How many turns of the tables each day? What's the profit margin on each menu item? What are your projected sales minus the total cost of goods sold and payroll and other expenses? Bottom line: Serving food really complicates things.

December 6, 2011

Chicago, IL - My Kind of (Beer) Town

Finally, I've had a chance to check out the city Sinatra's been singing about -- Chicago.

I was in the Windy City last week taking a Start Your Own Brewery course through the Siebel Institute.  The 3-day seminar was held at the Goose Island Pub in the Clybourn neighborhood and covered a wide range of topics, including business plan development, site selection and construction, brewpub operations, starting a packaging brewery, distribution, marketing, and much more.  The class was moderated by Ray Daniels, author of the highly-rated homebrewing manual Designing Great Beers.  For each segment of the class, Ray brought in different players from the Chicago and Midwest beer scene to talk about their experiences.  I was pleasantly surprised with both the breadth and depth of the course.  Hearing from people who had actually been successful in the beer business was both inspiring and eye-opening.

DAY 1 started with a brief overview of the course and introductions by each of the students in the class.  The 53 students came from all over the country.  I noticed the class was about 80-90% bearded male, a trend commented on here and inspiring this brewer and his blog.  Anyways, I digress.

October 7, 2011

Atlanta, GA: Wrecking Bar Brewpub

Have you ever been to a restaurant where every single thing you try is fantastic?  That's what happened this past weekend at the Wrecking Bar Brewpub in the Little Five Points neighborhood of Atlanta.  I discovered what is possibly the best brewpub in the South.

September 10, 2011

Remembering Oktoberfest 2006 in Munich

Exactly two years ago yesterday, I brewed my very first batch of beer, an Oktoberfest Märzen. It was the right time of year for the style, but it was also a great way to remember a 2006 visit to Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany. So, last night, to commemorate two years of brewing, I made an Oregano Pale Ale, dubbed Oregano Hoptoberfest and inspired by a recipe in The Homebrewer's Garden. I'll get into that shortly, but first, a trip down memory lane...

Oktoberfest was one hell of a celebration. The event typically lasts for a couple weeks and draws millions of visitors. I had a week off from classes, so I bought a Eurail train pass and visited Holland and Germany. I met up with a college buddy, whom we'll call Double G (aka Gregg), and we descended on Munich without much of a plan, but with a massive appetite for beer.


I was surprised to find there was more to Oktoberfest than just beer -- there were rides and games and really incredible food, too, but of course we started with beer: Spaten Oktoberfest in giant, 1-liter steins.

After several liters of beer, a few turkey legs, a roller coaster ride, and a bratwurst or two, we took a quick break to recharge for the evening festivities.


Our mission for the night was to get into one of the giant beer tents, which we were able to do without too much delay (I seem to recall sneaking in).


That's when things got a little out of hand...

PROST!!!
Soon after this picture was taken, Double G and I followed some Australians to figure out our accommodations, but we managed to get split up.  I ended up sleeping in public areas all over the city: inside the train station, outside the train station, in an ATM kiosk, in a church.  But we met up again the next day and an Erdinger Weissbier made everything better:


We even got to see some sights:

A famous clock, the Rathaus Glockenspiel, at Marienplatz.
View of Marienplatz, the inner city square, from a tower in the Frauenkirche.
The sun going down in the English Gardens.

Oktoberfest was a blast and I wouldn't change a thing about that trip.  I would, however, like to return and plan the accommodations ahead of time.  I plan on going back sometime in the next three years.  Anyone up for an adventure?

Thanks, GG, for the photos and the good times.

Alright, next up, the Oregano Hoptoberfest experiment...

September 9, 2011

Check Out This Great Blog

Logo borrowed from traderjoes.com
Trader Joe's fans - this is for you.

I just wanted to take a quick break from making some beer to share a great blog I found recently, What's New at Trader Joe's.  Husband and wife team Nathan and Sonia are on a mission to sample everything Trader Joe's has to offer and review it. They've only gotten as far as reviewing a few of TJ's somewhat marginal lagers, but I think the site and the concept is fantastic.

Maybe they'd let me do a guest post on some of TJ's other brews?

On a side note, I hope Trader Joe's will expand their selection of local beers.  While the one in town has Williamsburg AleWerks, I'd love to see some Legend Brown Ale, St. George's IPA, or maybe O'Connor's El Guapo IPA.

Curious what I'm homebrewing?  Stay tuned...

September 4, 2011

Afton, VA - Blue Mountain Brewery

I visited Blue Mountain Brewery last month with on a day-trip to Charlottesville, VA. I was particularly interested in checking out this brewery for its hop farm, where they grow Cascade and Centennial hops to use in a couple of their beers. Blue Mountain sure had a great location, with fantastic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains all around. Only about 20 miles west of Charlottesville, the place was doing pretty good business.

It was about 105F that afternoon, so cold beer was definitely in order. We opted for a couple of flights, which included (from right to left) Blue Mountain Lager, a Belgian White Ale called Blidö de Blanche, Rockfish Wheat Ale, Full Nelson Pale Ale, Mandolin Artisanal Ale (a Belgian Tripel), and a Kölsch.


To pair with our sampler, we got a cheese plate of local meats and cheeses as well as a selection of fruit. The salamis and cheeses really helped to bring put some of the beers into context.

The Classic Lager was just that - classic - and very refreshing. The Belgian ales, the Blanche and the Mandolin, were respectable. The Blanche was very light, making use of a champagne yeast, which seemed to give it a bit of lemony tartness. The Mandolin, on the other hand, was pretty sweet, with strong caramel and toffee notes. The Kölsch seemed very accurate to style, with a malty lager/pilsener taste accented by noble Hallertauer hops. The Rockfish Wheat was very nice for 100 degree weather - it was a filtered wheat so lighter bodied, crisp, somewhat sweet, with a hint of citrus. My favorite of the bunch though was the brewery's flagship beer, the Full Nelson Pale Ale. Using the brewery's own Cascade hops, this beer was just what the doctor ordered on that sweltering afternoon. Copper in color, it had a nice malt background with a burst of fresh Cascades - very well balanced.

Sufficiently cooled, we stepped outside to check on the hop vines real quick. We had just an hour to make it to Starr Hill Brewery before it closed for the day...


August 31, 2011

Mad Fox and Chili Dogs!

Guest post from Anton:

Made another trip to the most local brewery I know... Mad Fox, set in a nice little part of Falls Church, VA, just minutes from my apartment.



Mad Fox is a great place for lunch, dinner, or the quick growler fill-up. I was at Mad Fox for the last of these options.

Feeling culinary, I went in to grab a nice beer to go with a special chili recipe that I had just created--man do I love cooking! Anyway, the chili was supposed to be for eating straight from the bowl; however, it turned out more like the kind of chili meant for chili dogs.. and spicy ones at that! Adapt and overcome, right?




So, after asking the Mad Fox bartender to recommend a beer for spicy foods, I ordered some wings and a cask Porter. Yum!

Within an hour and a half, notes in one hand and growler in the other, I set off for a delicious adventure!

Here is my recipe for Mad Fox Porter (Inspired) Spicy Chili Dogs

At least six hours before eating:

Turn on some tunes
Clean Crock Pot
Add to Crock Pot:
½ cup water
3 Jalapeno and Cheese Sausages (diced into bits)
1 Frozen Turkey Patty
2 Tbsp Strawberry Preserves
¼ Red Onion (diced)
4 Whole Jalapenos (seeded and minced)
1 Tbsp minced garlic
Squirt of Lime Juice
3 Dashes Chili Powder
1 Can Tomato Bisque Soup
1 Can Tomato Paste

Cook for 6 hrs on low

20 Mins before you’re ready to eat

Cook 2 polish sausages in bacon grease recycled from breakfast (BACON!!!)
Add ½ cup of onions and ½ cup of Mad Fox Porter beer to sausage and bacon mix
Toast Buns

Drink beer and chill...e (get it?)

August 12, 2011

A Local Gem: Hidden in the Rough




Hello, all!

It's Anton again and I'm stoked to follow up David's post about the taxation of beer.

Though I want to write more about the economics of beer, I will save that for my next post since I've been delaying the following for some time.

Alas, in this post, I will be introducing some (and perhaps reintroducing others) to one of my new favorite local beers. Kick back, grab a brew, and build up an appetite because I'm putting on my chef hat and cooking locally (with beer)!
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So, the other day I was in Safeway gathering items for the nightly feast (a.k.a. dinner) and I decided to do something I rarely do. “Today is the day to start from the left,” I said. For the ones who don’t know, at this particular Safeway, the left side of the beer aisle refrigerator is reserved for a very special kind of beer.


Ok, maybe it’s not fair to call it “shitty” beer.. let’s call it “unfortunate” beer. Yes, that's better. The left side of the beer cooler at this Safeway is the land of misfortune.

Fortunately for me, however, I happened upon a gem of magnificent beauty.

Now, since most people reading this blog may not know my prediliction for drinking brew-dogs, let me explain. Where some say, “I love beer,” let's just say I throw up my fists and yell:

“Hooray for beer!!”

I mean, I grew up on beer: the first time I had a beer was [redacted] and that was the Summer I also learned how to ride a [redacted] without training-wheels. So, yeah, I've been drinking for at least [redacted] years. But enough about me, let's get back to the story...

As I stood across from the unforunates, something glimmered in the florescent Safeway lighting; lurking in the shadows, amidst the Miller High Life and Steel Reserve sat a local treasure calling my name.

Mind you, I'm not saying I had a Lord of the Rings moment wherein my "precious" was calling out to me; however, I'm not saying that I didn't have a Lord of the Rings moment either...the important point is what peered out from the wasteland of the unfortunates was none other than a Port City Optimal Wit.






And now for some background:

Port City Brewing Company is a craft brewery located minutes from Washington, DC—in Alexandria, Virginia.

Voted Washingtonian Magazine’s 2011 “Best Brewery Tour,” Port City Brewing Company is a local beer with attitude. ...well, I just made up that whole "with attitude thing"; but, suffice it to say that this beer is bang-a-lang-dangin. It would most likely get a "Very Nice" on my personal Likert scale... so, take that as you may.

Granted, I would have been happy had the story ended there, but not only did I find this local beer hidden amongst the shite, however, Port City’s “Optimal Wit” was the cornerstone to the recipe burning a hole in my pocket: The Homebrew Chef's Wit Braised Chicken.

The Homebrew Chef, Mr. Sean Paxton, has the following recipe on his website:


2 TBSP Olive Oil
3 Slices Pancetta, thick cut or bacon (optional)
1 Whole Chicken, cleaned and cut into 6th
(Leg/thigh, breast, wing)
Sea Salt and Pepper
2 TBSP All Purpose Flour
1 TSP Coriander, whole
1 TSP Orange Zest, dried
1 Each Leeks, cleaned and sliced
2 Each Shallots, peeled and diced, about 1 cup
3 TBSP Thyme Leaves, fresh
1 Bottle Wit Style Beer*, 750ml
1 Cup Chicken Stock, preferably homemade
1 Cup Heavy Cream, organic

So, in effort to recreate this recipe with a local twist I modified (and specified) the following:





3 Slices of Smithfield (Virginia) thick-cut bacon
1 Whole Chicken (Locally farmed, free-range, organic)
2 TBSP fresh Thyme from my garden
1 Bottle Port City Optimal Wit
1 Cup Organic Chicken Stock
1 Cup 1/2 and 1/2, organic

The result was delightful; my wife actually claimed it was, "Gravy-licious."



By using spices such as orange zest and coriander, I was really able to accentuate the undertones of the Optimal-Wit. Like most Belgian Wit beers, the Wit beer style of Port City's Optimal Wit has hints of both orange and coriander in its finish. According to Port City,

"Our Optimal Wit is brewed in the Belgian Wit Bier tradition. It is brewed with raw wheat and oats, and steeped with coriander, orange peel and grains of paradise. This ale is a pale golden color with a bit of cloudy haze from bottle conditioning. This unfiltered ale offers layers of complex, nuanced flavors that evolve in the glass. It finishes crisp and refreshes the palate."

The Homebrew Chef recommends using: "Blanche de Chambley from Unibroue, Blanche de Brugge, Hoegaarden or Celis White." Though of those beers I've only had the pleasure of sampling Hoegaarden, I can say that if the others are anything near the quality of Hoegaarden, reproducing this recipe with each beer would be a task worth undertaking.

A Hoegaarden on the patio is always a Summer treat:




Now that I've eaten all the Wit Braised Chicken left overs (and I've used the gravy in three meals since), I am ready to go back to Mr. Sean Paxton and see what other delights I am able to create with local beers.

Please feel free to comment or ask clarifying questions on the recipe. I find that Mr. Paxton includes the exact amount of detail an intermediate chef requires. Even so, however, I am pleased to offer any insights or recommendations on this recipe.

Until next time, remember to have a great day with a great beer.

Take it easy,

~Anton





July 30, 2011

Homebrewers: Need Your Input for My Next Batch

Up until this point, I've only made beer using a pre-made kit or recipe.  I've made some minor modifications here and there, but I think it's time to build my own recipe from scratch.  Here's the plan:

These guys are going in...
I'd like to make a good summer beer - a pale ale, not too hoppy (something that would sell well).  I'm planning on dividing the 5 gallon batch and experimenting with adjuncts.  In the largest container I'll have the basic recipe - the only additive will be a cup of light brown sugar to the boil.  In the two other containers I'll add hand-picked peaches from a local Virginia farm, peeled, pitted and frozen, with different proportions in each of the smaller containers.  What do you think?  My main question is, what type of hops should I use?  I think I want to finish with Willamette, and maybe use Cluster, Centennial, or Tettnang to bitter.  What's your suggestion?  Feel free to comment on the blog or Facebook, or send me a message on Twitter.  Thanks!

Here's my recipe so far:

0.5 lb Flaked Wheat (mashed)
0.5 lb Flaked Oats (mashed)
4.5 lbs Briess Light LME
2.5 lbs Briess Wheat LME
1 cup Brown Sugar
1 oz Centennial hop pellets at 30 mins to go
0.5 oz Willamette hop pellets at 20 mins
0.5 oz Willamette hop pellets at 10 mins

WLP041 Pacific Ale Yeast

0 peaches per gallon on secondary A
2 peaches per gallon on secondary B
4 peaches per gallon on secondary C

Estimated OG: 1.068
Estimated FG: 1.017
Estimated ABV: 6.6%

July 29, 2011

Live from Legend Brewing Company - Richmond, VA


The last time I wrote about Legend, I was reporting from Barret's Seafood Restaurant in Williamsburg.  This time I'm going straight to the source.  To start things off, I went with the old standard, Legend Brown Ale, which according to the Legend website poll is preferred by over a third of responders.  To chase that down, I ordered a pretty respectable Kabob sandwich with a side of Brown Ale sauerkraut.  Believe it or not, you can actually taste the beer's influence on the kraut.  I understand not everyone is a fan of boiled cabbage, but if you appreciate the German culinary influence I suggest you give it a shot.

Next up, a cask-conditioned Pale Ale: smooth, with a substantial foam head and dominated by citrus and floral hop notes.  Given that this beer is made with four varieties of hops, it does demonstrate a pretty complex flavor.

And to round things out... I sampled a Smoked Chocolate Stout, and while I dig the smokey beers (something of a novelty in the States right now), I'm not too keen on drinking a whole pint of it at the end of a session.  Maybe at a barbecue.  I'm going for the IPA instead.

Surprisingly less hoppy than the Pale Ale, clear and golden, it's a little spicy and has the mouthfeel of a lager.  I like it!

Unfortunately, Legend only offers tours on Saturdays at 1pm, so I won't get a chance to see the inner workings of the brewery this time around.  I'll have to make that happen next time I'm in the area.  Stay tuned!