Showing posts with label Delaware. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Delaware. Show all posts

August 2, 2012

It's IPA Day: 5 Favorites from the Local Beer Blog

Fuller's IPA, in the English style.
Today is International IPA Day, a celebration of what is probably America's most popular style of craft beer, the India Pale Ale.

But the style was not invented in the US. I'll quickly relate its origins:

IPAs emerged way back when, during the height of the British Empire. To satiate her troops abroad, Britain would ship beer to its colonies, most notably India. Utilizing the natural antimicrobial properties of the hop flower, the ale was aggressively hopped with as much as four or five pounds of hops per barrel so that it may survive the long voyage. The style gained popularity in the mid-1800s, then faded away until fairly recently.

June 14, 2012

The Charleston Beer Exchange

The Charleston Beer Exchange ought to be a certified craft beer Mecca -- any beer fan passing through the area MUST make a stop here. From the top regional brews to the most obscure beers from around the world, CBX has just about every kind of craft beer you can think of, and then some. They've got hundreds of bottles and cans, more or less arranged by region, plus nine taps at the growler station that change on a regular basis. Stay up to date with what's on tap here.

June 7, 2012

Back in the USA!

USA Craft Beer Map from SwiftMaps.com
After about four months of living in Panama, I am back in the USA for a month to visit friends and family.  I intend to take advantage of this time back in the Southeast to check out some cities both new and familiar, to visit as many breweries and brewpubs as I can, and of course enjoy some great beer and food.

Naturally, about the first thing I wanted to do was go to the good old American grocery store and survey the beer aisle.  (Insert songs of heavenly angels here.)  The selection!  The variety!  Renowned beers from American breweries coast to coast!  IPAs!  I restrained myself and did a build-your-own six pack of some more or less regional beers:

  • Red Brick Hoplanta (GA) - "Hoppier than a bullfrog with a stubbed toe!"
  • Sweetwater Georgia Brown (GA) - "Smoother than a Bill Clinton apology!"
  • Dogfish Head Indian Brown Ale (DE) - "A cross between a Scotch Ale, an India Pale Ale and an American Brown, Indian Brown Ale is well-hopped and malty at the same time (It's magical!)."
  • Dogfish Head 60 Minute IPA (DE) - "60 Minute IPA is continuously hopped -- more than 60 hop additions over a 60-minute boil."
  • Sweetwater Exodus Porter (GA) - "First brewed on Bob Marley’s birthday, this Legend-ary porter initially delivers distinct irie hop notes which transcend into rich waves of chocolate, creating a multidimensional taste experience!"
  • Abita Jockamo IPA (LA) - "The flavor is bold like the Mardi Gras Indians who march through New Orleans in suits of feathers and beads."

Let this mark the beginning of an excellent state-side adventure!

Beer, glorious beer!


April 12, 2012

Delaware Online: A behind-the-scenes tour of Dogfish Head Brewery in Milton

I've been to the Dogfish Head Alehouse, but I have yet to visit the production brewery in Delaware.  This article by Patricia Talorico really makes me want to check it out:

A behind-the-scenes tour of Dogfish Head Brewery in Milton


About the author:
Patricia Talorico is the deputy features editor of The News Journal. She has written for USA Today and The Washington Post and been a contributor to Bon Appetit. Talorico has twice been nominated for James Beard Foundation Awards for best feature writing.

July 13, 2011

DC Day 3: Dogfish Head Alehouse

OK.  Now I know what all the hype is about -- and why the line for Dogfish Head at the American Craft Beer Fest was out of control the whole time. With a brewery based in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, Dogfish Head also has three restaurants in the DC area: two in northern Virginia, one in Gaithersburg, Maryland. I walked in, went straight for the bar, and ordered up a glass of their 90-Minute IPA.  The Dogfish IPAs are pretty well known among IPA fans, aka 'hopheads'. Dogfish does a 60-Minute, a 90-Minute, and a 120-Minute IPA, the 'minutes' referring to how long the beer spends boiling with hops. But rather than listen to me tell you about it, why don't you let the Dogfish Head founder, Sam Calagione, tell you himself?


And it was extremely delicious. I followed the IPA with a tasty Alehouse BBQ Burger - two beef patties cooked over a wood fire, bacon, onion rings, and cheese - and spent the next hour or so deliberating which beer to get next. This is where I was just about knocked off my barstool. The beer selection at Dogfish Head was truly mind-blowing. 'Standard' simply isn't part of their vocabulary. Nearly every single beer was made with ingredients that don't typically find their way into commercial beer. I sampled one called Theobroma, derived from a 3,200-year-old Aztec recipe and made with cocoa powder, honey, chili peppers, and annatto (a seed from a tree found in Latin America). I was shocked how light it was - none of those ingredients was overwhelming at all. I tried another beer called Black & Red, which was a strong, dark, fruity beer made with mint - lots of mint. After several samples, I finally decided on the Raison d'Etre, a Belgian Ale made with raisins and beet sugar.  As you might expect, it smelled and tasted somewhat sweet and somewhat fruity -- definitely a unique combination.  At 8% ABV, it also packed a pretty good punch on the alcohol scale.

I would have loved to hang out and try all the beers on the menu, but I figured I'd save some for when I visit DC again next week.  So -- stay tuned...

June 28, 2011

NOVA Brew Fest

A beautiful day, beautiful people, and lots of delicious beer.  Not a bad way to spend a weekend.


The Northern Virginia Brew Fest was held this past Saturday and Sunday in Leesburg, VA, about an hour west of Washington, DC.  Roughly 50 breweries were in attendance, plus arts & crafts vendors and some local bands.  I went up to volunteer, but had plenty of time to sample brews before, during, and after the event.

May 30, 2011

Williamsburg, VA: Williamsburg Alewerk's Coffeehouse Stout

There's no place like home and there's no beer quite like a stout.  Finding my parent's house completely devoid of any kind of beer (save for 3 Coors Lights leftover from my brothers' 21st birthday - not drinkable), I ventured to the nearest grocery store and picked up a sixer of my hometown brewery's Coffeehouse Stout.  Having brewed a batch like this myself, I was curious to see how it would go down.  To make things even more interesting, this beer was made with coffee from Antigua, Guatemala, one of the places I'd been to on my recent travels and where I'd had a fair amount of the local coffee.

As it is, a stout is a pretty heavy beer.  For some, it may just be too much to handle.  This dark stout has so much coffee flavor, I think that someone who wasn't a big beer drinker, but liked coffee, could really get along with it.  And as someone who likes coffee almost as much as they like beer, I see this six-pack going down pretty quick.

While the coffee flavor is somewhat overpowering, this beer is surprisingly sweet.  It lacks the complexity and creamy texture of Guinness, but it might be a good place to start if you want to start exploring some brews on the darker end of the spectrum.

This and other Alewerks brews can be found in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, DC.