Showing posts with label Virginia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Virginia. Show all posts

August 27, 2013

Craft Beer is for Lovers: Top Picks from the VA Craft Brewers Festival

2013 VA Craft Brewers Fest 
Capping off Virginia Craft Beer Month and a successful "Love on Tap" campaign by the state of Virginia, brewers and craft beer fans gathered this past weekend for the Virginia Craft Brewers Festival and Virginia Craft Brewers Cup. The event was held at Devils Backbone Brewing Company's Nelson County brewpub and concert grounds.

The weather was incredible, surpassed only by the setting, with mountain views for 360 degrees. Devils Backbone Brewpub sits on a huge plot of land in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, with almost no other buildings in sight. There were a fair number of people in attendance, about 2,200, but there was plenty of space so it didn't seem crowded. A huge stage was set up on the property for music, but the main attraction was most definitely the beer.

August 22, 2013

Local Beer Event Roundup

A lot of exciting beer events coming up in the Southeast: beer dinners, festivals, New Belgium "Clips" Film Festival... Are you ready?

Tonight, Aug. 22, 2013 - Oskar Blues Pint Night at the Brew Pump

The Brew Pump is a brand new beer bar in a converted gas station at 760 Haywood Road in West Asheville. This is the bar's first pint night, featuring our new neighbors from down in Brevard. There will be bluegrass music with Steven Shealy, free Oskar Blues merchandise, and the El Kimchi Food Truck will be on site providing the grub.

See you there.

Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013 - VA Craft Brewers Festival

March 14, 2013

Green Flash to Build $20m Brewery in Virginia Beach

This is such big news for craft beer in Virginia that I had to throw it up on the blog real quick. San Diego's Green Flash Brewing Company has just announced plans to build a second brewery in Virginia Beach. This will be a state-of-the-art facility with a 100,000 barrel capacity, employing 40 or more local workers. Production is expected to begin in 2015.

“The Mid-Atlantic region provided logistical advantages,” said Lisa Hinkley, co-founder of Green Flash. “Virginia is a great place to do business, has a developing craft beer culture, and Virginia Beach felt like home.”

Additionally, Green Flash is moving in with full intent to help develop Virginia's craft beer culture. They established a $10,000 credit with San Diego's White Labs, a leading producer of brewer's yeast, for members of the Virginia Brewers Guild to use for testing and quality control. Green Flash also plans to develop a Virginia Beach series of locally made beers and to support area charities.

Go #VAbeer!

Read the full press release at BeerPulse.com.

October 25, 2012

GABF Recap: Part 2

The remainder of the Great American Beer Festival and the long weekend in Denver was a blast. A little hazy, a little rough on the body, but packed with good food, good times, and great beer. (Read Part 1 here.)

Friday

The Kitchen's Portobello Sandwich with a
Denver Beer Co. Summer Ale.
After some much needed sleep and lots of water, Friday began with another trek up the Cherry Creek Trail towards downtown. I stopped in for lunch at the Kitchen, located on the corner of 16th and Wazee St. in LoDo.

Anticipating that some veggies might help soak up the beer ahead, I opted for the Portobello Sandwich. Locally-baked ciabatta with sautéed red onions, gouda cheese, house-made hummus, and greens -- the sandwich was fantastic! The mushrooms, onions, and greens were all regionally sourced and organic. The sandwich was accompanied by house fries (from organic Idaho potatoes) and homemade ketchup. (Homemade ketchup? Gotta try that!) Some Denver Beer Company Summer Ale washed it down. Awesome.

Heading to the festival a little early, I walked around the convention center for a bit sans crowd and snapped some photos.

August 14, 2012

Craft Beer in Cans: 9 to Try Today

Photo: CraftCans.com
You may have noticed an increase in the number of canned craft beers on the market lately. The benefits of canning are numerous:
  • Cans reduce the amount of light that can hit the beer, potentially "skunking" those delicious hop compounds
  • Cans weigh less than glass, reducing cost transportation costs
  • Cans are more recycled than glass and plastic
  • Cans go where glass can't, poolside, on a hike, or to a music festival for example
Some may question whether canned beer tastes the same as it's bottled counterpart, but I know for a fact that there are some very good canned beers out there.

Here are nine craft beers in the can to look out for:

August 2, 2012

It's IPA Day: 5 Favorites from the Local Beer Blog

Fuller's IPA, in the English style.
Today is International IPA Day, a celebration of what is probably America's most popular style of craft beer, the India Pale Ale.

But the style was not invented in the US. I'll quickly relate its origins:

IPAs emerged way back when, during the height of the British Empire. To satiate her troops abroad, Britain would ship beer to its colonies, most notably India. Utilizing the natural antimicrobial properties of the hop flower, the ale was aggressively hopped with as much as four or five pounds of hops per barrel so that it may survive the long voyage. The style gained popularity in the mid-1800s, then faded away until fairly recently.

August 1, 2012

5 Craft Beer Festivals to Attend This August


It's the first day of August and Fall is in sight! Don't let the summer go by without attending at least one beer festival!


Beer festivals are a great way to get outdoors, spend some quality time with friends, and enjoy some cold microbrews. Here are just a handful of beer festivals happening this August so you can start thinking about where you might soak up some suds this summer:

July 9, 2012

Richmond, VA: Hardywood Park Craft Brewery

Hardywood Park Craft Brewery has been on the Local Beer Blog radar for some time. They first caught my attention when I heard about the new brewery opening in Richmond, VA. I was then intrigued by the news that they were making a community-hopped IPA. When I read that Hardywood won a Bronze Medal at the World Beer Cup, it was clear that this was a place I needed to visit. I recently had the pleasure of meeting the co-founders at their production brewery in Richmond, VA to discuss their journey into the craft beer business and their various locally-flavored ales.

May 6, 2012

Announced: World Beer Cup 2012 Winners

This just in:

Winners of the 2012 World Beer Cup, a.k.a. "the Olympics of Beer Competition," have just been announced by the Brewers Association.  Brewers around the world are surely celebrating with a Sunday brew!

Special shout outs to some of the breweries from my travels:
  • Hardywood Park Craft Brewery, Richmond, VA
    • Category 6: Herb and Spice Beer
      • Bronze Medal: Hardywood Gingerbread Stout
  • Blue Mountain Brewery, Afton, VA
    • Category 17: American-Belgo-Style Ale
      • Silver Medal: Blue Reserve
  • Devils Backbone Brewing Co., Roseland, VA
    • Category 35: Vienna-Style Lager
      • Gold Medal: Vienna Lager
  • Boscos Brewing Co., Memphis, TN
    • Category 52: German-Style Pale Wheat Ale
      • Gold Medal: Boscos Hefeweizen
  • Revolution Brewing, Chicago, IL
    • Category 66: English-Style Summer Ale
      • Gold Medal: Cross of Gold
    • Category 94: American-Style Stout,
      • Gold Medal: Rise American Stout
  • The Brooklyn Brewery, Brooklyn, NY
    • Category 79: British-Style Imperial Stout
      • Bronze Medal: Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout

It's a big world of beer out there!  Check out the full list of winners here.


May 1, 2012

VA: 5th Annual BrewRidge Music & Craft Beer Festival

In the beautiful Appalachian Mountains of my home state, this weekend is the 5th Annual BrewRidge Music & Craft Beer Festival in Pembroke, VA.  Celebrate Cinco de Mayo at the Mountain Lake Conservancy with five Virginia microbreweries and live bluegrass music.  There's nothing quite like live music and craft beer in a beautiful setting.

Breweries in attendance will be Williamsburg Alewerks (Williamsburg, VA), Jefferson Street Brewery (Lynchburg, VA), The River Company (Radford, VA), Wolf Hills Brewery (Abingdon, VA), and Lost Rhino Brewing Company (Ashburn, VA).

More info on the Mountain Lake Conservancy website.

Buy your tickets here.

Now, if we could just get some bluegrass here in Panama...

April 10, 2012

This Weekend in Virginia: New River Brewfest

Festival season is certainly upon us.

Six great breweries from my home state of Virginia will be featured this weekend at the New River Brewfest in Radford, VA.

Saturday, April 14
12pm-6pm

$20 in advance/$25 at the gate

Participating breweries:


Bull & Bones

The River Company



Lost Rhino

Starr Hill

Legend Brewing Company

March 23, 2012

1st Annual Virginia Cask Ale Festival

Passing along this announcement from the blog Yours for Good Fermentables.


The First Annual Virginia Cask Ale Festival will be held April 21, 2012, at the Capital Ale House in Richmond, VA.

WHO: Devil's Backbone, Hardywood Park, LegendMad FoxO'ConnnorPort CityStarr HillWilliamsburg AleWerksWild Wolf

WHAT: each brewery will bring at least one cask for sampling
WHEN: Saturday, April 21, 2012.  There will be two, 4-hour sessions: 12pm-4pm and 6pm-10pm
WHERE: 623 East Main StreetRichmond, VA 23219 
WHY: The Festival will benefit the Virginia Brewer's Guild


Tickets: May be purchased at Hardywood Park or Capital Ale House
Admission is $20 in advance, and $25 day of fest
Admission includes 8 two-ounce samples and a tasting glass
Additional tasting tickets will be sold at $2 each

(max. 200 people per session)

February 14, 2012

Announced: 5th Annual NOVA Summer Brewfest

I attended and volunteered at the Northern Virginia festival last summer and had a fantastic time.  You can find more information and/or sign up to volunteer (starting May 10) through the website.


Here are the dates:

Saturday, June 23, 2012 - 11:00 AM - 9:00 PM
  
Sunday, June 24, 2012 - 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM 

Morven Park, Leesburg, Virginia

February 9, 2012

Virginia - Support Local Breweries through Senate Bill 604

If you live in Virginia, please take a few minutes to contact your representative and ask them to support SB604.  The bill would allow breweries to sell pints directly to consumers for consumption at their production facilities.

Read this for more information.

Click here to track down your representative and send them a message.

Act fast!  The bill goes before committee tomorrow morning.

UPDATE [May 15, 2012] - The bill has passed and has been signed into law!

January 28, 2012

Charlottesville, VA - Starr Hill's The Gift

Every time I walk down the beer aisle I'm confronted with a dilema: Do I really have to buy beer? (Usually yes) Ok, what to get? Of course it's nearly impossible for me not to buy beer when I'm already looking at it, but sometimes I just want to try something new. So what happens if you don't like the whole six-pack? Luckily, some stores will let you break down six-packs, which makes for a less risky investment than buying the whole sixer.  So, last time I went grocery shopping, I picked up one of these.

The Gift is a winter seasonal from the Crozet, VA, brewery Starr Hill. It is a Hellerbock, a strong lager that's lighter in color than a regular bock. Fun fact: Bocks are believed to have originated in the German town of Einbeck, which sounds a lot like ein bock, German for a billy goat.  That's why you'll sometimes find a goat on the label of a bottle of bock.


Smell - In the Gift, I found a lot of sweet malt in the aroma, along with some fruity notes, but essentially no hop aroma.


Appearance - The color is a light amber and the beer was very clear. The white head faded pretty quickly.


Taste - The taste echoes the aroma: lots of sweet, fruity malt, almost no hops. There is a tiny bit of hop bitterness on the finish.


Mouthfeel - The Gift is medium-bodied and with a somewhat frothy mouthfeel. Due to the relatively high alcohol content (6.5%), it provides a warming sensation, which is nice in the cold weather.


Overall - Starr Hill nails this style right on the head. The Gift actually reminds me a bit of Bass, because there was some definite fruitiness going on. Personally I prefer dark lager, but hey -- try it for yourself!

September 8, 2011

AleWerks Scores Big at the US Beer Tasting Championship!

I'm pleased to announce that my hometown brewery, Williamsburg AleWerks, has recently been deemed a Grand Champion at the US Beer Tasting Championship!  They beat out breweries from around the country to win the Belgian/French Specialty category with their Springhouse Ale.  Here's the category description from the USBTC Website:

Ales brewed in traditional Belgian/French styles including saison, biere de garde, 
farmhouse ale, Belgian pale ale, and Abbey single ale.  Excluded from this category are
Belgian Wits (included in its own category-below), Abbey/Belgian Strong Ales (tasted in 
Winter Session), and Belgian Bruin/Red Ales.

If you've ever sampled Belgian beers, you know that this category can cover quite a lot of ground.

Obviously I had to get a hold of this Springhouse Ale (what AleWerks calls a Belgian-style Farmhouse Ale) and try it for myself.

First impressions: Really like the label.  Pours slightly cloudy and orange with a bodacious, frothy head; very fragrant, almost smells like a white wine
The taste: Wow - very complex.  Good thing I have a 22 oz. bottle to dissect this thing!  Flavor has a lot of that same dry, white wine-like aroma, likely derived from the yeast strain, with just a touch of sourness.  There are some various spices in there but the beer is so well-balanced it's difficult to pick out any in particular.  Hardly any discernible hops flavor.
About mid-way through: Jeez, what's the ABV on this guy? (9.4% alcohol) Wouldn't have guessed it by the taste - and that's a good thing.
Final impression: This is one of the most challenging beers I've ever reviewed.  There's just so much going on, that as they say on the AleWerks website, "this is an interesting ale that deserves your attention."  Very well done.

With that, I'm going to savor the rest of this bottle and suggest you try it for yourself!

Check out the other winners of the 2011 Summer USBTC here.  Have you tried any of them?




September 4, 2011

Afton, VA - Blue Mountain Brewery

I visited Blue Mountain Brewery last month with on a day-trip to Charlottesville, VA. I was particularly interested in checking out this brewery for its hop farm, where they grow Cascade and Centennial hops to use in a couple of their beers. Blue Mountain sure had a great location, with fantastic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains all around. Only about 20 miles west of Charlottesville, the place was doing pretty good business.

It was about 105F that afternoon, so cold beer was definitely in order. We opted for a couple of flights, which included (from right to left) Blue Mountain Lager, a Belgian White Ale called Blidö de Blanche, Rockfish Wheat Ale, Full Nelson Pale Ale, Mandolin Artisanal Ale (a Belgian Tripel), and a Kölsch.


To pair with our sampler, we got a cheese plate of local meats and cheeses as well as a selection of fruit. The salamis and cheeses really helped to bring put some of the beers into context.

The Classic Lager was just that - classic - and very refreshing. The Belgian ales, the Blanche and the Mandolin, were respectable. The Blanche was very light, making use of a champagne yeast, which seemed to give it a bit of lemony tartness. The Mandolin, on the other hand, was pretty sweet, with strong caramel and toffee notes. The Kölsch seemed very accurate to style, with a malty lager/pilsener taste accented by noble Hallertauer hops. The Rockfish Wheat was very nice for 100 degree weather - it was a filtered wheat so lighter bodied, crisp, somewhat sweet, with a hint of citrus. My favorite of the bunch though was the brewery's flagship beer, the Full Nelson Pale Ale. Using the brewery's own Cascade hops, this beer was just what the doctor ordered on that sweltering afternoon. Copper in color, it had a nice malt background with a burst of fresh Cascades - very well balanced.

Sufficiently cooled, we stepped outside to check on the hop vines real quick. We had just an hour to make it to Starr Hill Brewery before it closed for the day...


August 31, 2011

Mad Fox and Chili Dogs!

Guest post from Anton:

Made another trip to the most local brewery I know... Mad Fox, set in a nice little part of Falls Church, VA, just minutes from my apartment.



Mad Fox is a great place for lunch, dinner, or the quick growler fill-up. I was at Mad Fox for the last of these options.

Feeling culinary, I went in to grab a nice beer to go with a special chili recipe that I had just created--man do I love cooking! Anyway, the chili was supposed to be for eating straight from the bowl; however, it turned out more like the kind of chili meant for chili dogs.. and spicy ones at that! Adapt and overcome, right?




So, after asking the Mad Fox bartender to recommend a beer for spicy foods, I ordered some wings and a cask Porter. Yum!

Within an hour and a half, notes in one hand and growler in the other, I set off for a delicious adventure!

Here is my recipe for Mad Fox Porter (Inspired) Spicy Chili Dogs

At least six hours before eating:

Turn on some tunes
Clean Crock Pot
Add to Crock Pot:
½ cup water
3 Jalapeno and Cheese Sausages (diced into bits)
1 Frozen Turkey Patty
2 Tbsp Strawberry Preserves
¼ Red Onion (diced)
4 Whole Jalapenos (seeded and minced)
1 Tbsp minced garlic
Squirt of Lime Juice
3 Dashes Chili Powder
1 Can Tomato Bisque Soup
1 Can Tomato Paste

Cook for 6 hrs on low

20 Mins before you’re ready to eat

Cook 2 polish sausages in bacon grease recycled from breakfast (BACON!!!)
Add ½ cup of onions and ½ cup of Mad Fox Porter beer to sausage and bacon mix
Toast Buns

Drink beer and chill...e (get it?)

August 24, 2011

Brewing 101: Amarillo Pale/Amarillo Peach

Since my previous post on homebrewing, I've been mighty busy visiting breweries in North Carolina and Virginia - and working on my next batch of beer.  Several of you offered some good tips, so I made a few modifications to the recipe.  If you're interested in making your own beer, this post will give you a taste of what's involved.

Here's the updated recipe for what I decided to call Amarillo Pale and Amarillo Peach:

1 lb. Flaked Wheat
1 lb. Organic Carapils Malted Barley
3 lbs. Briess Pilsen Extra Light LME (liquid malt extract)
3 lbs. Wheat LME
1/2 cup Brown Sugar
1/2 oz. Amarillo hops for 60 mins
1/4 oz. Amarillo hops for the final 15 mins
1/4 oz. Amarillo hops for the final 5 mins
WLP001 California Ale Yeast
The 5 gallon batch is to be divided into three parts, two of which will utilize locally-grown, hand-picked peaches as adjuncts.


1.  The first, least glamorous, but probably most important, step in making beer is to sanitize everything that may come in contact with your beer.  Otherwise you risk getting bacteria or wild yeast in your beer that could ruin the whole batch.

2.  Steep the grains if you have them.  In this case I did a "mini-mash" using a pound of flaked wheat for body and a pound of organic Carapils malted barley for flavor and fermentable sugar.  I put the grains into a gallon of water and did my best to keep the temperature between 150F and 155F to pull the enzymes from the mash without over-cooking them.


3.  Next, strain the grains, reserving the water (now called wort) and wash, or sparge, the grains with hot water to make sure you get all the good stuff out.  You can discard these spent grains now - mine go straight to the compost.


4.  Then mix in the malt extract and turn up the heat.  I used 3 lbs extra light liquid malt extract and 3 lbs wheat liquid malt extract, hoping for a light-colored beer with a decent amount of alcohol content.  Most homebrewers lack the equipment necessary to process 10-20 pounds of grain, so a malt extract, either driy (DME) or liquid (LME), is an easy way to get fermentable sugars into your wort.   Homebrewers might start with all-extract recipes and work their way up to all-grain as they become more proficient.


5.  Now the countdown begins.  I boiled the wort for 1 hour, adding the hops at different points in the boil to achieve bitterness, flavor, and aroma.  I chose Amarillo hops to (hopefully) complement the peaches.

Hops for homebrewing usually come in pellet form.
6.  When the boil is over, cool the wort to less than 90F.  Move to your primary fermenter, add enough water (preferably filtered) to make 5 gallons.  Take a reading of the Original Gravity (to calculate alcohol content later), then pitch the yeast.

7.  Over the next several days, the yeast will feed on the sugars in the beer, thus producing alcohol and CO2.

8.  About halfway through fermentation, move your beer from one container to another, adding any additional ingredients that you may have.  In this case, peaches, which I had already sliced, pitted, and frozen beforehand.  Amarillo Pale got no peaches, Amarillo Peach got two, and Amarillo Double Peach got four.

Amarillo Peach on the left, Amarillo Pale, and Amarillo Double Peach.
In ten days or so, we'll bottle it up!

August 12, 2011

A Local Gem: Hidden in the Rough




Hello, all!

It's Anton again and I'm stoked to follow up David's post about the taxation of beer.

Though I want to write more about the economics of beer, I will save that for my next post since I've been delaying the following for some time.

Alas, in this post, I will be introducing some (and perhaps reintroducing others) to one of my new favorite local beers. Kick back, grab a brew, and build up an appetite because I'm putting on my chef hat and cooking locally (with beer)!
---
So, the other day I was in Safeway gathering items for the nightly feast (a.k.a. dinner) and I decided to do something I rarely do. “Today is the day to start from the left,” I said. For the ones who don’t know, at this particular Safeway, the left side of the beer aisle refrigerator is reserved for a very special kind of beer.


Ok, maybe it’s not fair to call it “shitty” beer.. let’s call it “unfortunate” beer. Yes, that's better. The left side of the beer cooler at this Safeway is the land of misfortune.

Fortunately for me, however, I happened upon a gem of magnificent beauty.

Now, since most people reading this blog may not know my prediliction for drinking brew-dogs, let me explain. Where some say, “I love beer,” let's just say I throw up my fists and yell:

“Hooray for beer!!”

I mean, I grew up on beer: the first time I had a beer was [redacted] and that was the Summer I also learned how to ride a [redacted] without training-wheels. So, yeah, I've been drinking for at least [redacted] years. But enough about me, let's get back to the story...

As I stood across from the unforunates, something glimmered in the florescent Safeway lighting; lurking in the shadows, amidst the Miller High Life and Steel Reserve sat a local treasure calling my name.

Mind you, I'm not saying I had a Lord of the Rings moment wherein my "precious" was calling out to me; however, I'm not saying that I didn't have a Lord of the Rings moment either...the important point is what peered out from the wasteland of the unfortunates was none other than a Port City Optimal Wit.






And now for some background:

Port City Brewing Company is a craft brewery located minutes from Washington, DC—in Alexandria, Virginia.

Voted Washingtonian Magazine’s 2011 “Best Brewery Tour,” Port City Brewing Company is a local beer with attitude. ...well, I just made up that whole "with attitude thing"; but, suffice it to say that this beer is bang-a-lang-dangin. It would most likely get a "Very Nice" on my personal Likert scale... so, take that as you may.

Granted, I would have been happy had the story ended there, but not only did I find this local beer hidden amongst the shite, however, Port City’s “Optimal Wit” was the cornerstone to the recipe burning a hole in my pocket: The Homebrew Chef's Wit Braised Chicken.

The Homebrew Chef, Mr. Sean Paxton, has the following recipe on his website:


2 TBSP Olive Oil
3 Slices Pancetta, thick cut or bacon (optional)
1 Whole Chicken, cleaned and cut into 6th
(Leg/thigh, breast, wing)
Sea Salt and Pepper
2 TBSP All Purpose Flour
1 TSP Coriander, whole
1 TSP Orange Zest, dried
1 Each Leeks, cleaned and sliced
2 Each Shallots, peeled and diced, about 1 cup
3 TBSP Thyme Leaves, fresh
1 Bottle Wit Style Beer*, 750ml
1 Cup Chicken Stock, preferably homemade
1 Cup Heavy Cream, organic

So, in effort to recreate this recipe with a local twist I modified (and specified) the following:





3 Slices of Smithfield (Virginia) thick-cut bacon
1 Whole Chicken (Locally farmed, free-range, organic)
2 TBSP fresh Thyme from my garden
1 Bottle Port City Optimal Wit
1 Cup Organic Chicken Stock
1 Cup 1/2 and 1/2, organic

The result was delightful; my wife actually claimed it was, "Gravy-licious."



By using spices such as orange zest and coriander, I was really able to accentuate the undertones of the Optimal-Wit. Like most Belgian Wit beers, the Wit beer style of Port City's Optimal Wit has hints of both orange and coriander in its finish. According to Port City,

"Our Optimal Wit is brewed in the Belgian Wit Bier tradition. It is brewed with raw wheat and oats, and steeped with coriander, orange peel and grains of paradise. This ale is a pale golden color with a bit of cloudy haze from bottle conditioning. This unfiltered ale offers layers of complex, nuanced flavors that evolve in the glass. It finishes crisp and refreshes the palate."

The Homebrew Chef recommends using: "Blanche de Chambley from Unibroue, Blanche de Brugge, Hoegaarden or Celis White." Though of those beers I've only had the pleasure of sampling Hoegaarden, I can say that if the others are anything near the quality of Hoegaarden, reproducing this recipe with each beer would be a task worth undertaking.

A Hoegaarden on the patio is always a Summer treat:




Now that I've eaten all the Wit Braised Chicken left overs (and I've used the gravy in three meals since), I am ready to go back to Mr. Sean Paxton and see what other delights I am able to create with local beers.

Please feel free to comment or ask clarifying questions on the recipe. I find that Mr. Paxton includes the exact amount of detail an intermediate chef requires. Even so, however, I am pleased to offer any insights or recommendations on this recipe.

Until next time, remember to have a great day with a great beer.

Take it easy,

~Anton